ABOUT US
The Director Print
  • Jacqueline Bhabha
  • Dir., University Committee on Human Rights Studies
  • Associate, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
  • Jeremiah Smith Jr. Lecturer, Harvard Law School
Jacqueline Bhabha
Office Address:
  • Rubenstein-218
Mailing Address:
  • Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Mailbox 14
  • 79 JFK Street
  • Cambridge, MA 02138
Contact:
Assistant:
  • A Message From the Director:
    • No dimension of public life, domestic or international, is insulated from the possibility of human rights scrutiny. As the past year has amply demonstrated, issues as diverse as fighting terrorism, legalizing the status of undocumented populations and improving universal access to health care have become polarizing sites where human rights arguments occupy center stage. Each issue brings with it knotty theoretical puzzles and complex strategic challenges, material ideally suited to the interdisciplinary and critical inquiry that is at the heart of the mission of the University Committee on Human Rights Studies. The Committee has positioned itself at the center of key debates and cross-cutting collaborations for the Harvard community, strengthening the growing institutional presence of a strong and coordinated human rights constituency across the campus.

      Last year, for the first time in the University’s history, all three Harvard Human Rights Centers, as well as the professional schools and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, collaborated on a year-long public event series on the crisis in Darfur, which many consider the first genocide of the twenty-first century.

      Convening cross-disciplinary fora on human rights issues is central to the mission of the University Committee. But so is promoting the development of students’ academic skills in the human rights field. Here, two important advances have occurred over the last year. The University Committee has developed a comprehensive proposal for undergraduate education, including new courses, an integrating undergraduate seminar, and enhanced mentoring and research possibilities. The Committee has also been pleased to support a self constituted Harvard College Advocates for Human Rights group, which has organized human rights trainings and workshops, and encouraged undergraduates to participate in supervise research projects for students. Both these developments promise to strengthen the access of undergraduates to human rights education. We hope you will join us in realizing these goals.

      JACQUELINE BHABHA

      Director

      Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies
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  • Profile:
    • Jacqueline Bhabha is the Jeremiah Smith Jr. Lecturer in Law at Harvard Law School, the Director of the Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies, and a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Kennedy School. From 1997 to 2001 she directed the Human Rights Program at the University of Chicago. Prior to 1997, she was a practicing human rights lawyer in London and at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She received a first class honors degree and an MSc from Oxford University and a JD from the College of Law in London. She has published articles on human trafficking and smuggling, on transnational adoption and recently authored three reports entitled Seeking Asylum Alone about unaccompanied child asylum seekers. Her writings on issues of migration and asylum in Europe and the United States include a coauthored book, Women's Movement: Women Under Immigration, Nationality and Refugee Law, an edited volume, Asylum Law And Practice in Europe and North America,and many articles, including Internationalist Gatekeepers? The Tension Between Asylum Advocacy and Human Rights and The Citizenship Deficit: On Being a Citizen Child. She is currently working on undocumented child migration, smuggling and trafficking, and citizenship.
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  • Courses:
  • Fall 2007
  • ISP-229: International Childhood, Rights & Globalization
  • Social Studies 98jn - International Human Rights: The Challenge of Protecting Vulnerable Populations
  • Freshman Seminar 46p - Human Rights in Peace and War
  • Spring 2008
  • HLS - HLS Course No. 38230-31
  • Human Rights and Persecution: Issues in Forced Migration and Refugee Protection
  • Fall 2008
  • ISP-229: International Childhood, Rights & Globalization
  • Social Studies 98jn - International Human Rights: The Challenge of Protecting Vulnerable Populations
  • Freshman Seminar 46p - Human Rights in Peace and War
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  • Media Expertise:
  • Jacqueline Bhabha welcomes media inquiries on the following subjects:
  • Human Rights Policy
  • Immigration
  • International Law
  • Children’s Rights : adoption, citizenship, migration
  • European migration
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  • Publications:
  • BOOKS
  • 2007 Seeking Asylum Alone: Unaccompanied and Separated Children and Refugee Protection: A Comparative Study of Laws, Policy and Practice in Australia, The United Kingdom and the United States of America (Themis Press). Co-authored with Mary Crock.
    2006 Seeking Asylum Alone: Unaccompanied and Separated Children and Refugee Protection in the United States. (President and Fellows of Harvard College). Co-authored with Susan Schmidt.
    Seeking Asylum Alone: Unaccompanied and Separated Children and Refugee Protection in the United Kingdom. (President and Fellows of Harvard College). Co-authored with Nadine Finch.
    1994 Women’s Movement: Women Under Immigration, Nationality and Refugee Law. (Trentham Books) Co-authored with Sue Shutter.
    1992 Asylum Practice in Europe and North America. (Federal Publications, Inc.) Co-edited with G. Coll.
    1984 Worlds Apart: Women, Immigration and Nationality Law. (Pluto Press.) Co-edited with F. Klug and S. Shutter.
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  • ARTICLES / BOOK CHAPTERS
  • 2007
    • “The ‘mere fortuity of birth?’: Children, Borders, and the Right to Citizenship”, in ed. Benhabib and Resnick, Citizenship, Borders, and Gender: Mobility and Immobility (forthcoming, Routledge)
    • “Migration, Human Smuggling and Human Rights.” The International Council on Human Rights Policy Website
    • “Un Vide Juridique? — Migrant Children: The Rights and Wrongs” in ed. Carole Bellamy and Jean Zermattern, Realizing the Rights of the Child (Ruffer and Rub) 206-220.
    • “Gendered Chattels: Imported Child Labour and the Response to Child Trafficking”, in ed. M. Rajasekhar, Child Labour: Global Perspectives (Hyderabad: The Icfai UP) 55-77.
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    2006
    • “Border rights and rites: Generalisations, stereotypes and gendered migration” in ed. Sarah van Walsum and Thomas Spijkerboer, Women and Immigration Law: New Variations on Classical Feminist Themes. (Routledge. Cavendish)
    • “Gendered Chattels: Importing Children for Exploitation,” McGill International Review.
    • “’Not a Sack of Potatoes’: Moving and Removing Children Across Borders”, Boston University Public Interest Law Journal
    • “The Child — What Sort of Human?” PMLA, 1526-1535.
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    2005
    • “Trafficking, Smuggling and Human Rights”, Migration Information Source, Migration Policy Institute, March
    • "Rights Spillovers: The Impact of Migration in the Legal System of Western States", in ed. Van Selm and Guild, International Migration and Security: Immigrants as an Asset or Threat? (Routledge 2005).
    • “Reforming Immigration Policy: Start by Protecting Rights not Borders”, Boston Review Summer
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    2004
    • “Crossing Borders Alone: The Treatment of Unaccompanied Children in the United States”, Immigration Policy Brief, American Immigration Law Foundation
    • “The Mere Fortuity of Birth: Are Children Citizens?”, 15(2) Differences, Vol.15 No.2
    • “"Demography and Rights: Women, Children and Access to Asylum”, International Journal of Refugee Law Vol. 16 (2) 2004, 227-243.
    • “Seeking Asylum Alone: Treatment of Separated and Trafficked Children in Need of Refugee Protection”, 42(1) International Migration
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    2003
    • “The Citizenship Deficit: On Being a Citizen Child”, 46(3) Development, 53.
    • “More than their share of sorrows: International Migration Law and the Rights of Children”, 22 (2) Public Law Review, 253.
    • “Children, Migration and International Norms”, chapter in Ed. T. Alexander Aleinikoff & Vincent Chetail, Migration and International Legal Norms (T.M.C. Asser Press).
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    2002
    2001
    2000
    • “Lone Travelers: Rights, Criminalization and the Transnational Migration of Unaccompanied Children”, 7 Roundtable, University of Chicago Law School, 269-294.
    • Review of December Green, Gender Violence in Africa: African Women’s Responses, American Journal of Sociology, 1765-1767.
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    1999
    • “Not an Adult in Miniature: Children as Refugees” 11(1) International Journal of Refugee Law, 84 - 125, with Wendy Young.
    • “Out of the Frying Pan and into the Fire? Unaccompanied Child Asylum Seekers in the United States,” Social Politics, Summer 263-270.
    • “Enforcing Human Rights in the Era of Maastricht: Some Reflections on the Importance of States,” ed. B. Meyer and P. Geschiere, Globalization and Identity: Dialectics of Flow and Closure (Blackwells), 97-124.
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    1998
    • “Belonging in Europe: Citizenship and Post-national Rights,” 159 International Social Science Journal 11-23.
    • “Get Back To Where You Once Belonged: Identity, Citizenship and Exclusion in Europe,” 20(3) Human Rights Quarterly, 592-627.
    • “Through a Child’s Eyes: Protecting the Most Vulnerable Asylum Seekers,” co-authored with Wendy Young, 75 Interpreter Releases, 757-773.
    • “Review: Political Islam: Essays from Middle East Report”, Journal of Religion, Spring 1998.
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    1997
    1996
    1995
    • “European Harmonization of Asylum Policy: A Flawed Process,” 35 Virginia Journal of International Law, 101.
    • “European Union Asylum and Refugee Policy,” 60/1 International Practitioners Notebook, 29.
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    1993
    • “Harmonization of European Immigration Law,” 70 Interpreter Releases, 49.
    • “Asylum Developments and Recent European Court Judgements,” 70 Interpreter Releases, 605-612.
    • “The Legal Problems of Refugee Women,” 4 Women: A Cultural Review, 239.
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    1992
    • “Recent Changes in U.S. Asylum Law,” Legal Action, March.
    • “Domestic Exile from the Law,” Legal Action, June.
    • “Deterring Refugees: The Use and Abuse of Detention in U.S. Asylum Policy,” 6 Immigration and Nationality Law and Practice, 117.
    • “Letter from London: Recent European Immigration Developments,” 69 Interpreter Releases, 1197.
    • “Delays in the Immigration and Nationality Department.” Evidence drafted on behalf of the Immigration Law Practitioners Association. Published in Report of the Sub-Committee on Immigration Advice of the Home Affairs Committee, House of Commons.
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    1991
    1981
    1976
    • “The Peasant Connection: Social Background and Mental Health of Emigrant Workers in Western Europe,” Proceedings of Bradford University Transcultural Psychiatry Conference.
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    1975
    • “Divided Families: A Report to the Home Secretary on the Effect of British Immigration Laws on Asian Families,” Oxford Social Studies Action/Research Team Report.
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